Boston Educators and Students Demand Access to A Better Curriculum

The status quo approach to curriculum in Boston Public Schools (BPS) creates confusion for teachers and inequitable outcomes for students.

The district does not officially vet and recommend curricula, so each individual school must start from scratch when trying to select frameworks that are high-quality and culturally-sensitive. In addition, the state only requires that curriculum frameworks “avoid stereotypes,” but says nothing about elevating BIPOC perspectives, histories, and texts. 

 To end this inequity, a group of BPS educators came together with a mission to develop solutions and demand A Better Curriculum in their district and their state. Their recommendations: 

  • BPS must commit to creating a formalized vetting and recommendation process which results in curricula for campuses to choose from that meet quality, cultural-responsiveness, and ease-of-use standards.

  • Massachusetts must pass legislation that ensures every district uses curriculum frameworks that are inclusive and actively antiracist, currently filed as the Racially and Culturally Inclusive Curriculum Act (HD3219/SD1965).

Learn more about our educator-led plan to achieve this better curriculum in Boston and beyond by reading our A Better Curriculum (ABC) campaign memo.


Take Action

E4E-Boston educators worked hard to design, write, and advocate for a bill that creates antiracist curriculum frameworks in Massachusetts. Now, the Racially and Culturally Inclusive Curriculum Act is a reality and has a real chance at passing in the Massachusetts legislature. Help show decision-makers that it has broad support by adding your name to our petition.



What Educators and Other Experts Say

Our call for BPS and Massachusetts to act on this urgent issue is informed by local, state, and national statistics that indicate we need a change:

  • BPS teacher, E4E-Boston member, and co-author of the ABC memo Joellen Persad shared with Today.com how systemic racism can be perpetuated through schools and curriculum

  • In E4E's Voices from the Classroom: A Survey of America's Educators 2020, just 25% of Boston teachers said that curricula was accessible for all learners in their classrooms

  • An ELA curriculum selected by BPS was found to have 78% of its texts written by white authors

  • In March of 2020, the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education found that BPS approached curriculum in a way that was “inconsistent” and the district is “unable to identify which curricula are being used in each of the district schools”

  • The National Bureau of Education Research finds that culturally responsive curricula increase student attendance by 21 percent, GPA by 1.4 grade points, and credits earned by 23 percent


Spread the Word

Can’t make it out to one of our events? Support the campaign by sharing one of the messages below on social media.

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