Natalie Harrington Managing Director of Outreach

Raised in a home that provided daily proof of the freedom and success that come from getting a great education, Natalie was exposed to the inequities of our current educational system when volunteering in college. Eager to make change, she began teaching in the South Bronx at New Day Academy, a persistently failing school.

Natalie realized that while a teacher can have a significant impact on students’ lives, there are systemic issues pushing back against student success. In 2011, Natalie joined Educators for Excellence as a member and worked on a teacher policy team, became a teacher leader and served as E4E’s first summer resident. As an E4E member, she saw firsthand how powerful it is when teachers can come together to create solutions to the issues that affect schools and how engaging with E4E helped to sustain her work in the classroom.

When New Day Academy closed its doors in June of 2013, Natalie joined E4E full time as a Bronx outreach director. In her two years in that role, she learned how to be an organizer and saw E4E evolve its model to build a sustainable movement that was both pro-union and pro-change. Later, as a senior outreach director in New York, Natalie supported the growth of the New York team and helped outreach directors to work with teachers on campaigns around school climate and getting out the vote for the United Federation of Teachers triennial election.

In fall of 2016, Natalie moved up to Boston to help start E4E’s newest chapter. Drawing on best practices from all of our local chapters, it is Natalie’s goal that E4E-Boston will be for teachers what E4E-New York was for her when she taught in the Bronx − a positive space to address the challenges facing educators and their students and, even more so, a space to develop solutions to address those challenges.

"Too often, well-meaning policies breakdown in implementation. The only way we can make meaningful change for kids is to empower educators to impact the decisions that impact their schools."